Archive for the ‘Brooklyn’ Category

Adam Stennett.

Adam Stennett.

“When I am working on a show I start to gather objects and images that speak to me or may have something to say. My studio becomes immersed in the aesthetic and energy I will be exploring in my paintings and other works. The process is a bit like meditation. The space around you will influence the work you create.”

Peter Nguyen.

Peter Nguyen.

“My approach to my work is very personal in the sense that I try to solve my own problems. It’s probably the easiest way to create – if there’s something I want, or if there is something that exists that I am unhappy with, I design a solution. I already have one customer (myself) and a design teacher once told me if you can sell to one person, you can sell to 100.”

Dan Funderburgh.

Dan Funderburgh.

“I live and work in Brooklyn but play soccer in Chinatown. These desks I use for drawing, cutting paper, drinking, and basically pretending to be an artist. I really like it here. I’m inclined to want to dive into a project and start researching and drawing arabesques right away.”

John Wray.

John Wray.

“There’s a desk in my studio somewhere–probably under all the crumpled up balls of shitty writing and sundry other forms of refuse–but I’ve stopped using it altogether in the last year or so. I now generally write with my laptop on my knees, sitting or lying on one of the two sofas, which works pretty well until I fall asleep.”

Hiro Kurata.

Hiro Kurata.

“We are living in an unstable era, where people are not sure of where the whole world is going and so many people need to create art. The process and consequences of making art is to heal one’s heart; but the interesting but crucial part of this is that not everyone is able to continue creating art.”

Doug Johnston.

Doug Johnston.

“Since making the stitched rope pieces has become my full time job, most of the time the studio is arranged for that work. In taking photos I had planned to arrange everything neatly and compose things in a thoughtful, designerly way, but I chose instead to just show the comfortable bit of chaos that I work amongst daily.”