Archive for the ‘Brooklyn’ Category

Doug Johnston.

Doug Johnston.

“Since making the stitched rope pieces has become my full time job, most of the time the studio is arranged for that work. In taking photos I had planned to arrange everything neatly and compose things in a thoughtful, designerly way, but I chose instead to just show the comfortable bit of chaos that I work amongst daily.”

Iviva Olenick.

Iviva Olenick.

“Ever-shifting piles of fabric, scraps of ribbon, spools of thread, skeins of embroidery floss, embroidery scissors, watercolor and fabric paints, needles in various shapes and states of wear, and artwork in process as well as finished pieces adorn the surface. The prominence of this desk in my small studio space is a metaphor for the predominance of my artwork in my thoughts and daily activities.”

James Victore.

James Victore.

“We used to have two motorcycles parked in the studio, but a modicum of success drove them out. I don’t have any collections, I like to travel light and don’t like to dust. The studio is more of a combination garage and kitchen– with some workspace thrown in. I like the adage, “The more you know, the less you need.”

Mark Pernice.

Mark Pernice.

“I’m thinking about setting up an office in the shower. Get dressed, COFFEE, work, try to take a break and get outside for a bit, maybe have lunch with another designer, back to work. I try to move around. Sometimes I’ll sit on the couch, balcony or counter top with my laptop. I need that to stay fresh.”

Ellen Weinstein Talks With Marcos Chin.

“I work best when I’m unedited, uncompromised and when I can comfortably sit in a space and be uncomfortable, creating something, and then throwing it on the floor, putting something else up on the wall, and tearing it down, over and over again. It’s this playful quality about my process that I believe helps me to remain creatively engaged in whatever I’m doing.”

Joseph O. Holmes.

Joseph O. Holmes.

“I used to stumble across some beautiful work desks as I wandered the city, and I’d make a mental note of the location and return in a day or two with a tripod. I didn’t want to call ahead because I wanted to capture the spaces as they were — cluttered, not cleaned up and neatened.”